This is my PURGE post, and it isn’t a movie review

Lloyd Lofthouse:

The tragedy is that there are proven, positive methods to improve public education, but President Obama and Bill Gates are all but ignoring those solutions for something malignant.

Originally posted on Crazy Normal - the Classroom Exposé:

Sunday, I walked downtown to see The Purge: Anarchy, and while watching the film and walking home afterwards, I couldn’t stop thinking about the unnamed New Founding Fathers mentioned at the beginning of the film—who were in their ninth year as the leaders of the United States. In case you forgot or never knew, the U.S. Constitution limits a U.S. president to two, four-year terms. Therefore, with the current U.S. Constitution, there’s no way one president can stay in office nine years. But in this film that’s set about a decade in the future, the United States is led by a cabal that calls itself the New Founding Fathers that’s more like the Politburo of the old Soviet Union. There is no mentioned that the United States still has a Congress or Supreme Court.

Let’s get the synopsis of this film out of the way first with no spoilers…

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A Writer’s Cave—Here’s mine

On a recent Wednesday night near sunset, I looked out my writer’s cave window and saw this scene. The front of the house faces the sunset, and I ran outside and snapped off four shots with a borrowed smart phone.

One

Then I asked myself, why not do a post showing where I write—the clutter, the mess. A digital camera made this silly idea easy.

The first shot is toward the north, the second shot east, and the third faces south. The last one faces west from inside the house toward my desk and the window.

Two

 

Three

 

Four

 

Five

I built all the bookshelves and drawers. Did you notice the wood carving of a fight scene from The Romance of the Three Kingdoms? There’s a story behind that wood sculpture to share one day.

This post was written to avoid editing and revising a manuscript. I spend a lot of time in this ninety-square-foot room facing the sunset. It’s amazing how much space we actually use most of the time.

_______________________

Lloyd Lofthouse is a former U.S. Marine and Vietnam Veteran,
who taught in the public schools for thirty years (1975 – 2005).

His third book is Crazy is Normal, a classroom exposé, a memoir. “Lofthouse presents us with grungy classrooms, kids who don’t want to be in school, and the consequences of growing up in a hardscrabble world. While some parents support his efforts, many sabotage them—and isolated administrators make the work of Lofthouse and his peers even more difficult.” – Bruce Reeves

Lofthouse’s first novel was the award winning historical fiction My Splendid Concubine [3rd edition]. His second novel was the award winning thriller Running with the Enemy. His short story A Night at the “Well of Purity” was named a finalist of the 2007 Chicago Literary Awards. His wife is Anchee Min, the international, best-selling, award winning author of Red Azalea, a New York Times Notable Book of the Year (1992).

To follow this Blog via E-mail see upper left-hand column and click on “FOLLOW!”

How Blogging helped me find Readers and sell Books

It seems that many authors think that if they are not writing a book, it’s a waste of their time. For instance, producing a blog. If you are an author who thinks that way, I suggest you think again, and learn how to blog properly.

To make a point, I’m not going to start out talking about blogging. I’m going to mention poetry. Back in the early 1980s, I fell in love with writing poetry when I took a summer workshop from a Pulitzer Prize winning poet while I was working toward an MFA in writing.

I have never earned any money from my poetry, but I write it anyway and post my poems on Authors Den. The 124 poems I’ve posted there have had almost 80-thousand views. My latest poem, Smartphone, has had more than 50 views so far, and I posted it this week.

My fifty-five articles on Authors Den have had almost 50-thousand views, and the fifty-two news pieces I posted there have had more than 23-thousand views.

In fact, the excerpts of my three books on Authors Den total almost 72-thousand views.

There’s also one short story, and it’s had 1,917 views. I also published A Night at the Well of Puritya finalist in the 2007 Chicago Literary Awards—on one of my blogs where it’s had another 125 views.

The idea behind all of this free stuff that I write is to attract readers who might decide to buy and read one or more of my books, and I also enjoy doing it.

But the Authors Den stats are nothing compared to the views on the Blog I launched to support my first book, My Splendid Concubine, a novel that’s sold more than 20-thousand copies. iLookChina.net has 7,481 followers and more than 500-thousand views. In fact, I can track the before and after sales of the novel this blog supports as part of my branded internet author platform.

As I’m writing this post, iLookChina currently has 1,897 posts, and I wrote most of them. So far, for 2014, the site averages 239 views a day. I launched iLookChina in late January 2010, but Concubine only sold 221 copies its first year in 2008, and to promote the book that year, I was on 31-radio talk shows as a China expert, held several author events in local brick-and-mortar bookstores, and conducted two book-blog tours—but I wasn’t blogging.

How has blogging translated into sales of My Splendid Concubine? Well, by the end of 2010—after I had written and published more than 1,000 posts on iLookChina, Concubine sold 2,375 copies that year—more than four times the combined sales of the first-two years. In 2011, Concubine sold another 4,641 copies, and in 2012, four thousand one-hundred-fifty-eight sold, and more than five thousand in 2013.

In addition, in 2009, before I launched iLookChina.net, Concubine sold only 341 books for an average of 28 a month—that’s less than one a day. Over the years, I’ve launched several other blogs and published two more books, a thriller called Running with the Enemy, and a memoir called Crazy is Normal, a classroom exposé.

There’s another benefit to writing more than just books. The more an author writes—even Blog posts or poetry that readers may view free—the better the author’s writing becomes, and when I took an all-day blogging workshop from Bill Belew through the South Bay branch of the California Writers Club in late 2007, Belew said we can write a Blog and eventually turn what we write into a book.

What I don’t do on my blogs is write that much about me, my writing habits, or my books. This post is one of the exceptions. Instead, I focus on China, its history, its politics, its culture and its people. For the blog, The Soulful Veteran, that supports my thriller, I write mostly about war, combat, military issues, PTSD, etc. For my third book, a memoir, I write about teaching, public education, children and parenting at Crazy Normal.  Then there’s this blog, Lloyd Lofthouse.org, where I write on any topic that strikes my fancy. I’ve even written about Growing up with Oranges.

After every post I publish, there’s a line that separates the post from a short bio of me and a blurb about my books with links—scroll down to see what I’m talking about. To learn more about how to Blog properly, I suggest you start out by watching the two videos from Bill Belew that are embedded in this post. Because Belew taught me how to blog, why not let him teach you too?


This presentation explains how to overcome the obstacle to getting started with your blog and web site. Bill Belew is an SEO and web traffic guru – a real one. No fancy tricks. Just long hard and long lasting effort.

In conclusion, if you read this far, thank you for visiting. You may never buy or read one of my books, but you might tell someone about this post who will. Think about it.

_______________________

Lloyd Lofthouse is a former U.S. Marine and Vietnam Veteran,
who taught in the public schools for thirty years (1975 – 2005).

His third book is Crazy is Normal, a classroom exposé, a memoir. “Lofthouse presents us with grungy classrooms, kids who don’t want to be in school, and the consequences of growing up in a hardscrabble world. While some parents support his efforts, many sabotage them—and isolated administrators make the work of Lofthouse and his peers even more difficult.” – Bruce Reeves

lloydlofthouse_crazyisnormal_web2_5

Lofthouse’s first novel was the award winning historical fiction My Splendid Concubine [3rd edition]. His second novel was the award winning thriller Running with the Enemy. His short story A Night at the “Well of Purity” was named a finalist of the 2007 Chicago Literary Awards. His wife is Anchee Min, the international, best-selling, award winning author of Red Azalea, a New York Times Notable Book of the Year (1992).

To follow this Blog via E-mail see upper left-hand column and click on “FOLLOW!”

John Ogozolak’s Choice: Clean a Septic Tank or Grade a Test?

Lloyd Lofthouse:

Worth reading to understand the horrors caused by the Obama administration on the public schools. If ever a president wanted to destroy the country he ruled, what the Obama’s administration is doing is exactly the road map to follow. And I voted for this fool twice. Never again. As far as I’m concerned the Democratic Party is on notice that they are about to lose my vote and it won’t go to the GOP. I
The United States needs a new political party for the independent voters who can think for themselves.

Originally posted on Diane Ravitch's blog:

John Ogozokak, a high school teacher in upstate New York, ponders here which is the more meaningful task: to clean a septic tank or to grade a standardized test:

About a half dozen years ago the septic tank lurking beside our old farmhouse went kerflooey. I dug out the top of the rusty thing and it was clear something VERY wrong had happened. I’ll spare you the graphic details but suffice to say I had to rig up a temporary pipe until the experts could arrive days later. It was a smelly, nasty job. But as I was standing there, ankle deep in crap under a beautiful spring sky, I found myself wondering……would I rather be doing THIS or dealing with some of the nonsense I encounter every day in school -like inflicting mindless standardized tests on students.

I vote for the septic tank. And, not just mine. No, I’d…

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Is there a Silent Majority in the United States and, if so, do they have a seat at the table of power?

President Reagan often talked of the silent majority as if he were its voice—like the Pope for the Catholics— but I think that was far from the truth. In this post, I’m going to reveal who that silent majority might be. But first, let’s eliminate the tea party people, who are not silent, because over time, various polls have found that slightly over 10% of Americans identify as a member of the tea party.

There are several groups that rule America, and they are not all in the Congress, the White House or the Supreme Court. Some are billionaires—for instance: the meddling Bill Gates, the Koch brothers, the Walton family, and Eli Broad along with a few other fools with too much wealth.

Then there are the citizens who vote, because they are a powerful force too. The popular vote may not elect the President of the U.S. or the justices of the U.S. Supreme Court but they do elect—for instance—the members of Congress, governors, mayors, state legislatures and public school boards in almost 14,000 school districts.

In the late 18th century, the Founding Fathers of the United States didn’t set up a democracy where every citizen could vote. In fact, the Founding Father were afraid of mob rule, and only allowed about 10% of the citizens to vote. When the Constitution was written, only white-male property owners (about 10 to 16 percent of the nation’s population) had the vote.

By 1850, almost all adult white males could vote, and in 1870, the 15th Amendment gave former black male slaves the right to vote.

Then in 1920, the 19th Amendment gave women the vote.

Along the way, there were attempts to limit who could vote through poll taxes and/or literacy tests—aimed at minority men, and I wouldn’t be surprised if some states are still attempting to do this, but people who can’t pass literacy tests are not the silent majority I’m talking about.

From the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press we learn that only 35 percent of the adult population votes regularly. Another 20 percent votes intermittingly, and 23 percent of registered voters rarely vote while twenty-two percent are not registered.

I’m going to focus on the regular voters, because they have the power to decide who wins most elections in the United States.

Twenty-eight percent, who were high school grads or less, are regular voters—meaning 72 percent are not. Then 38 percent of those who have some college are regular voters in addition to 46 percent of college graduates.

Did you notice that when it comes to voting, a large gap separates those with low literacy skills from those with higher literacy skills?

The National Center for Education Statistics reported that in 2003, 31 percent of college graduates read at the highest proficient literacy level and 53 percent read at the next highest intermediate level. Intermediate indicates skills necessary to perform moderately challenging literacy activities. Proficient indicates skills necessary to perform more complex and challenging literacy activities.

Together, this reveals that 84 percent of college graduates read at a high level of literacy and as you saw earlier in a previous paragraph, they also vote in dramatically higher numbers.

When we look closer at the high school (HS) graduates and dropouts, we discover that 48 percent of HS graduates read at intermediate or above, while only 17 percent of HS dropouts do. (NCES.ed.gov). I think it is arguable that the majority of this group with only HS degrees, that votes regularly, are also more literate than those who don’t vote.

If we boil all of these numbers down, who represents the largest, most powerful regular voting bloc in America?

In 2013, there were 242.4 million adults in the U.S., and if only 35 percent are regular voters, which means 85 million American citizens age 18+ belong to that group, and more than 62 million of those regular voters have some college or are college graduates. In that block of voters, almost 53 million read at high literacy levels, and it is arguable that they are harder to fool with cherry picked lies, because they are more likely to have the skills and knowledge necessary to turn to sites like Vote Smart, Fact Check.org, or Snopes.com to discover who is lying to them, and then vote accordingly. Actually, I use all three and a few more.

Among regular voters, that block of 53 million represents 62 percent, and all that’s needed is a simple majority to swing elections to decide who ends up in Congress, governors’ mansions, state legislatures and school boards. If we add a few million more highly literate readers from the HS only crowd, that number of more informed voters could be much higher.

Simply, the more you read, the better informed you might be and according to the Pew Research Internet Project, 62 percent of high school grads or less read at least one book in the past year compared to 83 percent of those with some college and 88 percent of college graduates.

In addition, adults with some college or college graduates read more e-books (77 percent) compared to those with a high school education or less at 14 percent revealing that those who have more education with higher literacy levels spend more time on the internet. In fact, 45 percent of adults with some college or who were college graduates are frequent readers compared to HS grads or drop outs at 12 percent. (The General Reading Habits of Americans)

Once informed of the facts that reveal the truth of an issue, it will be this group of regular voters who could easily change the political climate of America for the better and limit the power of the loud 10 percent that belong to the tea party, and the billionaire oligarchs like Bill Gates and the Koch brothers.

For certain, it’s clear that small groups with agendas that will hurt the majority of Americans in the long run don’t want this group of regular, literate voters to become informed. Because they are more difficult to fool, it’s this block of regular voters that the United States must depend on to preserve the people’s freedom.

In conclusion, the silent majority of regular voters in the United States is highly educated and likes to read, and even if they don’t know it, they have a seat at the table of power, because the fate of most elected officials is in their hands. Imagine the power this group would have if they organized.

UPDATE on 7-11-2014 @ 12:20 PM PST

In another forum where I mentioned this post, I got this comment:

Unfortunately Lloyd, literate, well-educated over 65s, in the 2012 elections voted overwhelming for Republicans, see Alliance for Retired Americans website .. We have been doing a poor job .. Too much of what we do is defensive .. Too much is tearing down rather than leading .. What is our message?

Here’s my reply:

While it is true that the majorly of tea party thinking Americans are well educated, they are also mostly older men. How many college educated are in this group?

I’m talking about all highly literate Americans age 18+ who have some college or are college graduates. The men over 65 who think tea party poop are a small segment of that group.

“In 2011, the percentage of Americans between the ages of 25 and 64 with a two- or four-year college degree was 38.7 percent. This is an increase from last year’s report; in 2010, the attainment rate was 38.3 percent. Overall, the U.S. attainment rate has been increasing slowly but steadily; in 2008, it was 37.9 percent, and in 2009 it was 38.1 percent. …

“In 2011, 45 percent of women between the ages of 25 and 64 held a two- or four-year college degree, compared to 40 percent of men.”

http://www.luminafoundation.org/stronger_nation/report/main-narrative.html

In fact, people age 65 and over only make up 14.1% of the population and persons under 18 make up 23.3%. That leaves 197.8 million (62.6 percent) who are between 18 to 64. In addition—3.08% of those people over the age of 65 have some college while only 2.86% have BA or better college degrees and that leaves 8.15% of this age group with a high school desgree or less.

http://www.census.gov/prod/2012pubs/p20-566.pdf

Let’s crunch the numbers:

About 75 million between ages of 25 – 64 have some college or have college degrees compared to 2.56 million over age 65 who have some college or a college degree.  The over-the-hill tea party gang is severely outnumbered by the silent majority I’m talking about.

_______________________

Lloyd Lofthouse is a former U.S. Marine and Vietnam Veteran,
who taught in the public schools for thirty years (1975 – 2005).

His third book is Crazy is Normal, a classroom exposé, a memoir. “Lofthouse presents us with grungy classrooms, kids who don’t want to be in school, and the consequences of growing up in a hardscrabble world. While some parents support his efforts, many sabotage them—and isolated administrators make the work of Lofthouse and his peers even more difficult.” – Bruce Reeves

lloydlofthouse_crazyisnormal_web2_5

Lofthouse’s first novel was the award winning historical fiction My Splendid Concubine [3rd edition]. His second novel was the award winning thriller Running with the Enemy. His short story A Night at the “Well of Purity” was named a finalist of the 2007 Chicago Literary Awards. His wife is Anchee Min, the international, best-selling, award winning author of Red Azalea, a New York Times Notable Book of the Year (1992).

To follow this Blog via E-mail see upper left-hand column and click on “FOLLOW!”

Linda Darling-Hammond: How to Close the Achievement Gap

Lloyd Lofthouse:

Linda Darling-Hammond of Stanford University reveals how to close the achievement gap in U.S. public schools while proving with facts that U.S. teachers work harder with less support in horrible conditions than any other developed country.

Originally posted on Diane Ravitch's blog:

Linda Darling-Hammond of Stanford University offers common-sense ideas about closing the achievement gap. She says that testing is less important than teaching. No surprise there.

She reviews an OECD study about teachers. What it shows is that teachers in the U.S. work longer hours under more difficult conditions than teachers in many other nations.

“Now we have international evidence about something that has a greater effect on learning than testing: Teaching. The results of the Teaching and Learning International Survey (TALIS), released last week by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), offer a stunning picture of the challenges experienced by American teachers, while providing provocative insights into what we might do to foster better teaching — and learning — in the United States.

“In short, the survey shows that American teachers today work harder under much more challenging conditions than teachers elsewhere in the industrialized world. They also…

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The Obvious Threat of Public Education to the One Percent

Originally posted on Crazy Normal - the Classroom Exposé:

In a recent online discussion, it was argued by one voice that the public schools have failed, because they don’t teach independent thinking.

However, I disagreed.

Evidence that the public schools work well—just not the way the one percent wants—comes from several surveys where the opinions of the top one percent are not included, because they can’t be reached.

I mean, if you wanted to call Bill Gates, Eli Broad, the Walton family or the Koch brothers, and ask them questions to a survey, how easy would that be? It’s obvious that the responses to surveys do not come from the one percent but from the 99 percent who are easier to reach.

Therefore, if anyone really want to know if the public schools do the job they are supposed to do, stop looking at standardized test results and look at the product of the public schools—that product…

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Teachers: now more than ever–your union membership matters.

Originally posted on teacherbiz:

This morning, the SCOTUS ruled–by a 5-4 vote–that Illinois home health care workers cannot be forced to pay dues to a union to which they don’t want to belong.  The court’s conservative majority, led by Justice Alito (who makes no secret of his anti-union sentiments), declared that because the home health care workers are not “full-fledged public employees,” they do not have to abide by laws that require state employees to contribute financially to a union.

While today’s decision is certainly a blow to organized labor, many union leaders and members are relieved that for the time being, the 1977 Abood decision that grants states the right to require workers to pay union dues remains intact.  But given that unions are under attack in all parts of the country (there’s even a group of CA teachers who are suing to stay out of their union), it’s very likely that the Supreme Court

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Thank you for asking me to review your book, but …

Occasionally, an e-mail arrives in my overcrowded inbox—like one did today—from an author asking me to review a book, and 99.9 percent of the time I say no. Then I offer advice on where to seek reviews from what I have learned since I launched my first title in December 2007.

Does that mean I don’t read books?  Of course I read books. I have exactly sixteen very patient tree-books waiting on my bedside table. Some have been waiting to be read for months. I also have four audio books (on CDs) waiting for me to review. These days, I read more books with my ears than my eyes.

Hint—ask avid readers for reviews who don’t write books. The odds of hearing a yes might be better.

The reason why I don’t accept 99.9 percent of books authors ask me to review is due to the fact that I’m usually spending fourteen hours a day, seven days a week, from 6:00 AM to 8:00 PM working on my next book, or promoting the books I’ve already published. For instance, it’s Sunday and I’ve been at it since before 6:00 this morning. I did take a break to walk two miles and eat. I’m eating now as I write this and it’s almost 4:00 PM.

I even force myself to get out of my chair and walk to the bathroom when the call comes, and Monday through Friday, I spend an hour a day exercising with weights and aerobics—something I get out of the way as early as possible.

Here’s some of the advice I offer:

I understand the hunger for reviews, so I suggest starting out with a Library Thing Giveaway in addition to hiring an internet publicist—my publicist is Teddy Rose—for a few hundred dollars to arrange a book blog tour that might generate a few more reviews that appear on Amazon and on blogs that review the book.

You might even want to attempt a Goodreads Giveaway, but be warned, there are trolls who are members of Goodreads dedicated to trashing books—that they never read—with rotten reviews and 1-star ratings, and that even happens on Amazon. Trolls are mean, sneaky, mentally ill people addicted to anonymously hurting others, and standing up to them just motivates the trolls to be meaner. Consider these trolls to be the Ebola virus of the internet. If you question why there are such people on the earth, think about Hitler, Stalin, Osama Bin Laden and Saddam Hussein.

You may not know this, but last year when I decided to stand up to a flock of Goodreads trolls who attacked me and my work, one of them predicted my career as an author was over—more than seven thousand copies of my work has been sold since that flame war.

Once a book has garnered enough positive reviews to be considered, I suggest submitting to sites such as BookBub or eReaderNews Today and then, if they accept the book for a paid e-mail blast advertisement—you have to offer it for sale at a reduced price or for free—be aware that not everyone who reads a book will review it, but a few might.

For instance, My Splendid Concubine had an e-mail blast from BookBub earlier this month, and the book has already garnered two, great 5-star reviews from verified purchases and one review from a troll that wasn’t a verified purchase—most trolls are too cheap to even pay 99 cents for a book they plan to trash. Since this June’s BookBub blast, as of this morning, Concubine has sold more than 3,000 copies.

There’s also eBookBooster to announce a book that is going on sale. Click the link and discover for yourself what eBookBooster offers and what it costs, and never forget that there are no guarantees for anything you do as an author to promote your work.

The truth is that for most authors, it takes time, patience and persistence to attract readers, reviews and build an audience. Because there’s a lot of competition from other authors, that means readers and sites like BookBub get to reject books and even ignore them if they aren’t interested.

There’s also another reputable site I know of to submit a book for a possible review, but even The Midwest Book Review only accepts about a third of the books sent to them. For instance, Midwest reviewed my first book, My Splendid Concubine, but didn’t review my second book, Running with the Enemy.

Midwest will not tell you that they haven’t accepted your book for a review or the reason why. What happens when a book is not reviewed by Midwest is that you will never hear from them. If they review the book, they will contact you and send you a copy of the review.

Also, be aware that Amazon will not allow sites like Midwest to post reader reviews. That doesn’t mean Midwest sells fake reviews, but it does mean that Amazon has a policy not to allow any review that was paid for to be posted on their site as a reader review.

Midwest reviews are free for paperbacks but not for e-books. Because Midwest charges a fee for e-books submitted to be reviewed, that disqualifies all Midwest reviews from being posted on Amazon as reader reviews even though they are reader reviews. Here’s my disclaimer—I have never paid Midwest for a review, because I have always submitted paperback copies to them.

Does that mean reviews that Amazon will not allow to be posted on their site can’t appear on the Amazon page of your book?

Unless Amazon changes their policies and rules, any reviews that Amazon rejects as a reader review may be posted through Amazon Author Central. To see what I mean, I suggest you visit the Amazon pages for My Splendid Concubine and Running with the Enemy.  Scroll down and read each Book Description and/or the Editorial Reviews section, where the awards and some pull quotes from reviews are posted. These appear before the reader reviews.

These are legitimate awards and reviews that come from reputable sources. The literary contests charged entry fees for juried literary contests that offer no guarantee that a book will earn an award. In fact, I have been told by the book festival organizers that less than five percent of submissions earn awards.

In addition, next time someone tells you that it’s wrong to pay a fee to enter a literary contest, consider this: The National Book Award that is announced in the national media annually, charges an entry fee of $135 for each title submitted, and the Pulitzer Prize charges authors/publishers a $50 entry fee and again charges to attend the award ceremony where an author, who is a finalist, might not win. The National Book Award and the Pulitzer are considered by the media to be two of the most prestigious literary awards in the United States and possibly the world.

_______________________

Lloyd Lofthouse is a former U.S. Marine and Vietnam Veteran,
who taught in the public schools for thirty years (1975 – 2005).

His third book is Crazy is Normal, a classroom exposé, a memoir. “Lofthouse presents us with grungy classrooms, kids who don’t want to be in school, and the consequences of growing up in a hardscrabble world. While some parents support his efforts, many sabotage them—and isolated administrators make the work of Lofthouse and his peers even more difficult.” – Bruce Reeves

lloydlofthouse_crazyisnormal_web2_5

Lofthouse’s first novel was the award winning historical fiction My Splendid Concubine [3rd edition]. His second novel was the award winning thriller Running with the Enemy. His short story A Night at the “Well of Purity” was named a finalist of the 2007 Chicago Literary Awards. His wife is Anchee Min, the international, best-selling, award winning author of Red Azalea, a New York Times Notable Book of the Year (1992).

To follow this Blog via E-mail see upper left-hand column and click on “FOLLOW!”

Schneider: What Bill Gates Told the Washington Post About Common Core

Lloyd Lofthouse:

This old fashioned investigative journalism from the Washington Post reveals how Bill Gates circumvented the democratic process and spent between $200 million to $2.5 billion to bribe officials—this is when donations become bribes of epic proportions—in almost every state and school district to take over policy for public education int he United States and fund writing that policy. Gates even bribed the teacher unions to stab their members in the back.

Originally posted on Diane Ravitch's blog:

On June 7, Lyndsey Layton of the Washington Post wrote a blockbuster article about how Bill Gates pulled off the Common Core coup, which the headline calls “the swift Common Core revolution.” In a short period of time, less time than it takes a state to write standards in one subject, the U.S. suddenly had “national standards,” written and then adopted by 46 states and the District of Columbia. The secret, revealed in Layton’s article: Gates paid for everything, and the U.S. Department of Education used Race to the Top funding as an incentive for states to adopt CCSS. Layton credits Gates with spending some $200 million for the writing, implementation, and advocacy of CCSS, but others believe that Gates’ investment was $2.3 billion. Whether $200 million or $2.3 billion, Gates bought control of standards, curriculum, and assessment in the vast majority of American public schools. Almost every major national…

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